Videos posted by Yasmin Zadeh

Life in the aftermath of WW2 for a working-class girl in South London

Life in the aftermath of WW2 for a working-class girl in South London

In the second part of her interview Violet speaks of the days after WW2. When her grandfather died her parents her self and her sister took over his flat and that is where she stayed until she was married. Violet describes the conditions of the flat, which seemed quite luxurious compared to other families of her background. They had an in-door bathroom and a roll-top bath in the kitchen. She speaks of her school days and the many different jobs she worked in after leaving school at 15... she worked in everything from being a machinist to a sausage linker! In those days working-class women never had the opportunity to go to university, factory and office work was what they all did until they were married...

WW2 Experiences of a working-class child in South London

WW2 Experiences of a working-class child in South London

Violet Redmont retells some of her poignant experiences throughout the Second World War. Although she was evacuated several times to Hertfordshire Violet was in South London, in particular the docklands surrounding Rotherhithe, during the some of the worst of the war. The docklands were badly affected by the bombing and Violet remembers a few particular stories of close escapes she and her family encountered... But even though she spent her childhood encountering hard times, Violet looks back on that time in a positive light and considers her family as being very fortunate during the war.

The London working classes finding work in the 1960s and the traditional role of women

The London working classes finding work in the 1960s and the traditional role of women

In her concluding interview Pauline Mounsey recounts what life was like in the 1960s for young adults from working-class backgrounds going into work. They would typically leave school at 15 and go into working in office environments. Finding work was much easier in the 1960s than it is now. Pauline remembers what the Bankside area where she worked was like in the 1960s and the vast changes that have occurred in the area since. She also speaks of the traditional role of young women of her age meeting their boyfriends at around 19 and getting engaged, marrying at 21 and subsequently leaving home and having children (and thus leaving work also).

Life as a war-time baby on a London bankside estate in the 1950s and 60s

Life as a war-time baby on a London bankside estate in the 1950s and 60s

Pauline Mounsey was a war-time baby, born in the aftermath of World War Two. She spent her childhood in a typical London working-class estate in Southwark. The area that is now home to the Bankside galleries and restaurants was made up of burnt-out buildings and desolate docks. The residents in her estate lived in crampt conditions but were happy and fulfilled. In this insightful interview she recalls what life was like for children born in the aftermath of the war. They made do with what would now be considered very deprived conditions, but at the time this went wholly un-noticed and they spent their days in a comfortable and secure community surrounded by friends. It was a simple way of life but an extremely happy one.

National Front march through Lewisham 1977

National Front march through Lewisham 1977

Patricia McKinnon Lower grew up in Lewisham since the 1950s and has remained in the area ever since. Here she remembers the event that became known as the 'Battle of Lewisham' in 1977. The National Front were given permission to march through South London, passing through Lewisham where the residents were mainly left-wing. It caused a massive uproar and police had to protect the National Front from violent left-wing demonstrations against their march. Shops were barricaded in fear of them being destroyed in the process, police horses frantically trampled all over people's front gardens... "The day has been seen since as a turning point in the fortunes of the National Front and the 1970s anti-fascist movement as well as in policing - riot shields were used for the first time in England." - Wikipedia